Archive for the ‘History’ Category

Retro Champions/Carroll Widdoes Was Robbed

Wednesday, December 11th, 2013

There once was a Buckeye football coach named Carroll Widdoes.  He was born in 1903 in, like Manny Pacquiao, Corazon Aquino, Efren Reyes, and Tim Tebow, the Philippines.  He went to Otterbein College, then he became an assistant coach to a young man named Paul Brown at Massillon Washington High School and later at The Ohio State University.  When Brown joined the Navy in 1944, Widdoes became the Buckeyes’ head coach.  His team went undefeated in his first year (9-0), and went 7-2 in his second year.  Then he left and eventually became the coach and athletic director at Ohio University (which will confuse Brady Hoke to no end).

Here’s the thing.  Widdoes’ 1944 Buckeye team went undefeated.  They beat three teams in the top 20, two in the top 6.  They had on their team the pride of Parma Senior High School, Les Horvath, the Heisman Trophy winner that year.  They had some of the same players who won the 1942 national championship, including Les Horvath.  They also were playing at the same time as Army’s dominant team (which included future Heisman winners Doc Blanchard and Glenn Davis), with whom they were retroactively given a share of the title.  But Ohio State doesn’t officially claim it.

Well I think we should.  Maybe it’s the disappointment of losing the Big Ten Championship this year.  Maybe I’m just trying to grasp at something positive.  But I think we should claim it.  We were undefeated and beat three top teams.  The only decent way to compare the teams is not great for us, but it’s not damning.  We both played Pittsburgh that year.  Army won 69-7, while OSU won 54-19.  Plus there’s a little bit of a conspiracy involved.  Ohio State’s All-Americans from the 1942 title team Lin Houston and Gene Fekete (and probably others) joined the army and did not play for the Buckeyes in 1944.  Now I’m not saying that the Army Black Knights football team started World War II to better their chances in the football world, but…..

There are precedents for claiming retroactively applied titles.  All polls and rankings before Frank Dickinson named Stanford champion in 1926 (with the brief exception of Caspar Whitney’s rankings from 1905-1907, each of which crowned Yale champion) were retroactively applied.  Here is a list of cases where schools only had retroactively applied titles and they officially claim them:

1926 – Alabama:  BR, CFRA, HAF, NCF & PS

1926 – Navy:  BS & HS

1927 – Texas A&M:  SR

1927 – Georgia:  BS & PS

1930 – Alabama:  CFRA & SR

1944??? – Ohio State:  NCF & SR

1950 – Kentucky:  SR

(Polls and systems used in abbreviations above:  Billingsley Report, Boand System, College Football Researchers Association, Helms Athletic Foundation, Houlgate System, National Championship Foundation, Poling System, and Sagarin Ratings.)

 

From 1953 to today, no one has claimed a title when it was only given by retroactively applied polls or rankings.  But some SEC schools claim their retroactive titles.  Why can’t we?

Why WE Hate

Friday, November 29th, 2013

Yesterday Michael at Eleven Warriors wrote a phenomenal post about why he hates That Team Up North. Our hatred doesn’t go back that far, mainly because we don’t remember FDR as President (YOU’RE OLD, MICHAEL! YOU’RE OLD!) As time continues to flow inexorably towards Armageddon or The Rock or whatever Michael Bay film is closest to the end of time, we realize that we have a pretty solid hatred of TTUN built up ourselves. For damn good reason.

For example:

That Time Shawn Springs Slipped
In 1996 the Buckeyes were undefeated. We were freshmen at The Ohio State University (est. 1870 in accordance with the Morrill Land Grant Act of 1862) 18 years old, and nursing our first hangover. This after having drank too much for the first – and sadly not last – time and providing our roommate in Alma Wacker Paterson Hall with ammunition to use while mocking us for years afterwards (17 so far to this point.) We sat in the dorm room next door to ours, avoiding sitting in front of the window because the sun made us want to throw up some more, somehow. We watched our undefeated Buckeyes lose a close game to a clearly inferior team. And it was all because Shawn Springs slipped on a slant route by Tai Streets and allowed him a long score from BRIAN GRIESE*. Sure, it might have been more complicated than that, but that’s what we remember. If Joe Germaine and David Boston and company hadn’t pulled off the Rose Bowl against Arizona State a month later we might have been permanently damaged.

* – The same Brian Griese who spent the entirety of Ohio State’s 60-35 win over Illinois a few weeks ago being paid by ESPN to bash the Buckeyes and all but beg voters to jump Baylor, Stanford, Notre Dame, and Eastern Illinois ahead of them. For “struggling” in a game they scored 60 points and won by 25. Suck it, Brian Griese.

That Time Charles Woodson and David Boston Got Into It
The next year TTUN was undefeated and we had only lost one game. We spent a lot of the game playing Hogan’s Alley on a friend’s NES and drinking Bud Ice* while it was going on. Mainly because – to us at 19 anyway – the Buckeyes really didn’t seem competitive in the game at all. Which, looking back, what the hell, Cooper? Our memories of the game are limited to David Boston taunting on a long touchdown even though the Buckeyes were still losing and our car getting stolen the same day. Also breaking up with our girlfriend and watching Mortal Kombat: Annihilation. Talk about a crappy day.

* – The next time we write about how dumb college students are remember this and remember that we know that about which we speak.

When Tom Brady and Then Drew Henson Beat Us
That really happened. Brady, okay, that makes sense. But Drew Henson, I mean, he was better at baseball than football and he wasn’t all that good at baseball. Fortunately for us we missed the 2000 game.

The Time We Lost The Year After We Won The National Championship
Admittedly, this one didn’t sting as much. Probably because of what had happened eleven months prior. Still, our starting RB was Lydell Ross and the Buckeyes gained all of 54 yards on the ground.

The Time They Made Our Whole Conference Look Bad
Yes, some alleged games in January of 2007 and January of 2008 that we don’t remember and are pretty sure were made up by Mark May and Herbie had something to do with it too. But we never lost to a 1-AA school. We especially didn’t when we were ranked in the top ten*. And we sure as hell didn’t lose to Toledo the next year.

* – Can you believe that TTUN team went 9-4 and beat Florida in the Citrus Bowl that year? That Florida, quarterbacked by Heisman Trophy winner and Korean Baptist Church heartthrob Tim Tebow and coached by …umm let’s not talk about that now.

The Time They Made Us Almost Feel Sorry For Them
After the 2009 Game, we felt a disconcerting notion. TTUN was so incompetent, so horrible, that we didn’t fear The Game like we used to. It took a lot of incompetence (see previous entry) but they managed it. That may have been the most unpleasant feeling of all after all the heartbreak, sorrow, and disappointment. We understand a little bit why The Joker wouldn’t let Harley Quinn kill Batman or why any villain in a movie will inexplicably save the good guy. Because they say afterwards “I’m the only one who gets to [beat you].” (In the movies and stories they say kill but let’s not get too crazy here.) It’s painful in its own way to see someone so helpless when you’ve spent years and years imagining them as the spooky monster who lives in your closet and eats babies. This is probably why Frodo couldn’t do away with Gollum. He was just so damn pathetic. And see where that got him?

The Time They Beat Luke Fickell
This was the strangest of all because a couple days after this loss – a winnable game that would have been an awesome upset – Ohio State introduced Urban Meyer as head coach. Also this gave Jabba the Hoke an image of competence as head football coach of TTUN that he might not completely have deserved* but we will continue to nurture if it keeps him at TTUN longer. It’s hard to be angry about that game because the Buckeyes were SO bad that year and the Wolverines were allegedly good.

* – Yes, they won the Sugar Bowl but it was over a weak Virginia Tech team. And yes, we lost in the Gator Bowl that year – thanks Gene! Outside of bowl season the only ranked team they beat was Nebraska. At home. Seriously, look at this schedule. It makes ours this year look like LSU’s in 2007.

The Time Brady Hoke Ate A Baby
We’re not 100% sure this happened. But it wouldn’t surprise us in the least if it did.

So there it is. If that’s not reason enough to hate That Team Up North, we don’t know what is.

Beating Bama, and the Winningest Teams of the 21st Century

Tuesday, September 17th, 2013

Enjoy the latest from Ye Olde Buckeye…

Once again, the idea for this post came about while we watched some football on Saturday.  Two things occurred to us during the Alabama – Texas A&M game.  First, there was the idea that John Football had the chance to defeat the almighty Alabama for the second consecutive time.  We wondered how rare this feat was during this period where the Tide keeps rolling over competition.  And we wondered how recently Ohio State had been defeated by one quarterback in consecutive games.  Second, we noticed some graphic that came up on CBS about the eras of dominance of Alabama, USC, and Miami during the 2000s.  We think.  We didn’t really pay attention to it.  (We were definitely NOT switching channels to Sister Act, which was on at the same time.)  Anyway, we wondered if it was indeed one of these three teams which had the best record in the 21st Century.

So, we went to the Internets (all of them) and tried to find answers to these wonderings.  First, we learned that Manziel, had his Aggies been successful, would not have been the first quarterback in the 21st Century to defeat Alabama twice in a row.  Nor would he have been the second.  Both Jordan Jefferson and Tim Tebow have performed the feat before.  LSU’s Jefferson did it in 2010 (sharing time with Jarrett Lee) and 2011 (Jarrett Lee started, but Jefferson came in during the second quarter), before losing to Alabama in the 2012 national championship game.  Florida’s Tebow did it in 2006 (sharing time with Chris Leak, and only passing once) and 2008 (all by his lonesome).

So when was the last time that our Buckeyes were beaten twice in a row by the same quarterback?  Correct us if we’re wrong, but we believe that you have to go all the way back to the 2001 and 2002 seasons to find such a successful quarterback.  It was none other than Phil Petty.  South Carolina’s Petty led the Gamecocks to two straight Outback Bowl wins over the Buckeyes.  Two very frustrating games.  Again, correct us if we’re wrong.

Second, we did a whole lot of maths and came up with a modified Top 25 for the 21st Century.  We began with the CBS-graphic-mentioned Alabama, USC, and Miami, added a few other teams we knew should be in such a mix, added some of today’s top teams, and finally added Notre Dame just for fun.  So below we have a select 25 teams and their records since the beginning of the 2000 season (including this season so far).  The first table shows the top teams by total wins.  The second table shows the top teams by win percentage.  There’s nothing too surprising.  Boise State leads both tables thanks to their schedule, though they have performed admirably against some other teams on this list.  Anyway, for your viewing enjoyment, here are stats:

team record
Boise St 149-22
Oklahoma 145-32
LSU 136-37
Ohio State 135-33
Texas 133-37
Virginia Tech 130-45
USC 129-40
Florida 127-44
Georgia 127-45
Oregon 126-42
Florida St 118-54
Wisconsin 118-55
Alabama 116-53
Auburn 116-53
Nebraska 115-57
Miami 114-50
TTUN 110-56
Clemson 108-60
Penn St 103-61
Oklahoma St 101-64
South Carolina 101-64
Tennessee 101-66
Notre Dame 100-64
Texas A&M 92-7
Stanford 84-74

 

team

win %

Boise St

.87134

Oklahoma

.81921

Ohio State

.80357

LSU

.78613

Texas

.78235

USC

.76331

Oregon

.75000

Virginia Tech

.74286

Florida

.74269

Georgia

.73837

Miami

.69512

Alabama

.68639

Auburn

.68639

Florida St

.68605

Wisconsin

.68208

Nebraska

.66860

TTUN

.66265

Clemson

.64286

Penn St

.62805

Oklahoma St

.61212

South Carolina

.61212

Notre Dame

.60976

Tennessee

.60479

Texas A&M

.56098

Stanford

.53165

 

Our Misplaced Ohioans

Tuesday, September 10th, 2013

It was during the Notre Dame – Michigan game that we noticed there were Ohioans on both starting lineups.  That got us thinking.  We know that Ohio has historically been a breeding ground of football talent, both playing and coaching, and – despite the Buckeye coaching staff’s recruiting efforts – some talented young men have chosen to take their business elsewhere.  But we wondered just how many Ohioans were playing for our rivals, whether it was because they chose foolishly or because we didn’t want them in our state anymore.  We are aware that, even though we hate to see Ohioans going elsewhere (especially north) for their matriculation (read: football playing), we often find and attract more skillful players from around the country and have no need for Youngstown’s Fitzgerald Toussaint.

So, regardless of talent or offers from Ohio State, here you can find compiled for your convenience some information about Ohioans who are currently plying their trade outside of our nations’s 17th  state.  Since we’re lazy, we only looked at our B1G foes and a few select regional teams from automatic qualifying conferences.  We also broke the numbers down according to the regions in Ohio from whence they came.  My chosen regions were, in declining order of population, the Northeastern corner of the state, the Southwest, Central Ohio, and the Northwest.  Some places represented in the count but not found in the regional breakdown are the No-Man’s Land towns of Steubenville, Mansfield, Lima, and Urbana, for those who are interested.

Without further ado, here are the numbers:

Team

Ohioans

NE

SW

Central

NW

Illinois

18

8

5

3

2

Indiana

16

9

6

1

 0

Iowa

12

5

3

1

2

Michigan

24

11

5

4

3

Michigan State

27

10

9

2

3

Minnesota

3

2

 0

0

0

Nebraska

8

5

1

0

2

Northwestern

19

8

4

4

1

Penn State

1

1

 0

0

0

Purdue

9

3

2

2

0

Wisconsin

14

1

9

3

1

Others

Maryland

0

0

 0

0

0

Rutgers

0

0

 0

0

0

Notre Dame

11

3

6

2

0

Pittsburgh

9

3

3

1

1

West Virginia

16

12

2

1

0

As you can see, our northern neighbors lead the pack; Michigan being so poor in footballing quality.  TTUN has some notable steals, though not all were offered by Ohio State, including 2013’s Dymonte Thomas (Alliance, espn93), Mike McCray (Trotwood, espn114), Taco Charlton (Pickerington, espn116), Jake Butt (Pickerington, espn179), Jaron Dukes (Columbus, espn233), and Ben Gedeon (Hudson, espn281), 2012’s enthusiastic turncoat Kyle Kalis (Lakewood, espn132) and Joe Bolden (Cincy, espn142), and 2009’s Fitzgerald Toussaint (Youngstown, no espn).  A few of these names are among the many weasels who have some kind of grudge at not being offered by the Buckeyes.  Others just ain’t right in the head.  Of course there’s quite an impressive history of Ohioans playing for TTUN, going back to the original traitor Horace Prettyman, that includes all their Heisman trophy winners not named Tom Harmon.

We were surprised that there were no Ohioans playing for our future league rivals Maryland and Rutgers (yet), and very surprised to see that there was only one Ohioan on Penn State’s roster.  West Virginia has a lot of guys from Northeastern Ohio, and Notre Dame continues to lure a lot of our decent players away.

Again, the majority of these guys weren’t offered by Ohio State, but our recruiters also lost the battles for quite a few of our highest-valued possessions.  These talented players include (along with their espn rankings):  2013’s Malik Zaire at Notre Dame (Kettering, espn189), Shelton Gibson at West Virginia (Cleveland Heights, espn198), and Mitch Trubisky at North Carolina (Mentor, espn219), 2012’s Ifeadi Odenigbo at Northwestern (Centerville, espn51), 2011’s Trey DePriest at Alabama (Springfield, espn38), and 2010’s Jordan Hicks at Texas (West Chester, espn4).  We also didn’t get some great names like Nebraska’s Courtney Love (Youngstown), Minnesota’s De’Niro Laster, and Indiana’s Ryan Phillis.  We really liked the idea of having a De’Niro and a Phillis on the team.  Oh well.  Our recruiting is looking pretty good these days nonetheless.  Go Bucks!

The 11th Game

Tuesday, November 6th, 2012

The Bye Week. What is there to talk about during a bye week? Well, good job so far, fellas. A very good job so far. As we all know, these battlin’ Buckeyes of our’s will be going into the Wisconsin game with an unblemished record, 10-0. So I decided to pick the bye week to have a short little discussion (with myself) about going into the eleventh game of the season and being 10-0. The Buckeyes have played an 11th game of the season for the past 40 years. Every year from 1972 on has seen an 11th game. Then you have to go all the way back to 1905 to see another 11th game. And there was a 12th game in that 8-2-2 season. 1904 had eleven games, including a loss to the Carlisle Indians a few years before Jim Thorpe enrolled. In 1903 OSU was 8-3. In 1896 we were 5-5-1. In 1894 we were 6-5. In all, the Ohio State Buckeyes are 47-47-1 in games eleven and beyond (24-20-1 in 11th games only). That’s not too bad considering many of those games were bowl games and Cooper era Michigan games.

We have only been 10-0 going into that 11th game seven times. Well, eight, including this season. And we’ve been undefeated ten times. And in how many of those nine previous undefeated seasons did we finish with an undefeated record? Two times. 2002′s national championship season, and 1973′s Rose Bowl-winning, USC-defeating, 10-0-1 season. Of course, this season is different. We have “nothing” to play for. Well, we have an undefeated season to play for. We have The Game to play for, which is a lot considering that it IS the most important game of the season. And now on November 17th, if we needed something else to play for, we can be playing for only the sixth 11-0 record in our history. Go Bucks!

Illinois, The Galloping Ghost, and a high school in Toledo

Friday, November 2nd, 2012

Red Grange was chosen as the Big Ten’s greatest icon by the Big Ten Network. I would have preferred that it be Woody Hayes, Archie Griffin, or Chic Harley (who wasn’t even included!), but I can’t complain too much about the choice of Grange. I’m just glad it wasn’t Bo Sklembachlor or Tom Osborne (since the BTN is so dead set on trying to convince the world that all of Nebraska and Penn State’s histories are relevant to Big Ten fans).

Harold Edward “Red” Grange was born in Forksville, Pennsylvania in 1903, but his family moved to Wheaton, Illinois when he was five. He was a high school, college, and pro football star, commentator, and some time actor. The day after his final college football game (against Ohio State) he and player/coach George Halas agreed terms for a contract with the Chicago Bears. Apparently he did alright for himself, but I’m more concerned with his school days.

After being a four sport star at Wheaton High School, earning 16 varsity letters in football, basketball, baseball, and track, he enrolled at the University of Illinois with the intention of competing only in basketball and track. He scored three touchdowns against Nebraska in his first game for the Illini, who went on to go undefeated and win the 1923 national championship – as did Fielding Yost’s Michigan team, since the teams didn’t play each other in that year’s Big Ten schedule. They did play in 1924 though, and every Buckeye should be a Red Grange fan for what he did to the defending national champion Wolverines in Memorial Stadium’s opening game. First, he returned the opening kickoff 95 yards for a touchdown. Then, he scored on a 67 yard run, again on a 56 yard run, and again on a 44 yard run, all in the game’s first 12 minutes. Those four touchdowns equaled the amount of touchdowns that Michigan had allowed during the entirety of the previous two seasons. He then sat out the second quarter (showing more mercy than the ugly northerners deserved), then returned for another touchdown run and passed for a sixth. One must assume that the mercy rule was enacted because the game ended 39-14. Grange’s 402-yard outburst was more than enough to give the sun and blue their first loss since the 1921 Ohio State game in Ann Arbor. ESPN and others claim that this game inspired Grantland Rice to give him the nickname “The Galloping Ghost”, but Grange said that Chicago sportswriter Warren Brown came up with the name. Rice did call him a “gray ghost” in a description of the 1924 game with Michigan. Also after this game, the Chicago Tribune said, “They knew he was coming; they saw him start; he made no secret of his direction; he was in their midst, and he was gone!” In the 20 games he played for Illinois, he ran for 3,362 yards, received for 253, and threw for 575.

Kickoff return TD vs Michigan

But back to Wheaton High School. In his junior year he scored 36 touchdowns while his team went undefeated. In his senior year his team only lost one game. In that game, a 39-0 loss to Toledo’s Scott High School, Grange was knocked out and remained unconscious for two days. Such is the power of Toledo. That Scott High School team was chosen by the National Sports News Service as the national champion. Take that, Illinois!

The Significance of Miami and Ohio

Tuesday, October 30th, 2012

When the Ohio University Bobcats met the Miami University RedHawks at Yager Stadium in The Battle of the Bricks this past weekend, there were more important facts and statistics involved than Ohio’s ranking in the polls. Ohio….and I am talking about Ohio University, located in Athens, Ohio. The one from the Mid-American Conference. The one called the Bobcats. I know it’s difficult for some, uh, slower people to recognize that there’s a difference, but….Oh! So you’re saying he’s NOT stupid, but is in fact trying to get under our skin? Oh! Well, very well done, sir. Clever. You sure got us. Anyway…. Ohio University was ranked twice this year, at 25th in week 7 then at 23rd in week 8. Prior to this year, the Bobcats were last ranked for seven straight weeks in 1968. And that’s it. They were never ranked before that. No doubt they would have been ranked if the AP Poll existed in 1915, a year when the only blemish to their 8-1 record came at the hands of the Redskins of Miami (I still believe that when Miami changed their mascot it should have been to a redskin potato).

How about Miami? They have had far more success on the football field. Overall, Miami is 651-395-44, which compares favorably to Ohio’s 516-525-48. Miami is 7-3 in bowl games, compared to Ohio’s 1-5. Ohio’s lone bowl victory was against Utah State. Miami has defeated the likes of Texas Tech, Arizona State, and today’s fairly successful SEC teams South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. Then, of course, Miami has seen some big names in the football world come through its program either as player or coach, including Clifton’s Woody Hayes, Barberton’s turncoat Bo Schembechler, Akron’s Ara Parseghian, Norwalk’s Paul Brown, Loudonville’s Ron Zook, Troy’s gone too soon Randy Walker, Toledo’s John Harbaugh, and Lima’s QB with a predilection (allegedly) for non-consensual sex Ben Roethlisberger. All Ohioans. They were champions four times in the Ohio Athletic Conference, three times in the Buckeye Conference, and fifteen times in the Mid-American Conference. They featured in the AP Poll in 1955, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, and 2003, being ranked as high as 10th in two different seasons.

So what is the greater significance of these two schools, one in which Ohio University leads the way? They are the first and second colleges founded in Ohio. Better than that, Ohio University was the first university established in the Northwest Territory and is the ninth oldest public university in the United States, being founded in 1804. It was conceived in the late 18th century, chartered as the American Western University in 1802, then founded one year after Ohio became the first state created out of the Northwest Territory, the 17th in all. Miami University, founded in 1809, is the tenth oldest public university in the United States. It was originally mentioned in an Act of Congress signed by President George Washington (therefore also in the 18th century), but was not passed by the Ohio General Assembly until 1809, and they didn’t get their first president until 1824, which was also when their first classes were held. The school closed in 1873, only to be re-opened in 1885 when it paid off its debts.

                    

So where do these two schools stand in the greater picture? Obviously there were colleges founded in the colonial era, including the Ivy League schools and others including The College of William and Mary and Rutgers. But, outside of the original colonies, where do they stand? I’m glad you asked. As far as I could tell, there were four colleges founded before Ohio University outside of the original colonies (if we’re counting the colonies as not including their western-stretching claims. West of the Appalachian Mountain Range, let’s say). Kentucky’s Transylvania University (1780) was the first college west of the Allegheny Mountains, and the 16th university in the United States. “Transylvania” means “across the woods”, and it was across the forest from Virginia in its Transylvania colony. Tennessee’s Tusculum College (1794) is the 23rd oldest operating college in the United States. The University of Tennessee (also 1794) was founded as Blount College two years before Tennessee became a state. In 1807 UT was rechartered as East Tennessee College. Finally, the University of Louisville (1798) was the first city-owned public university in the United States. It was founded as Jefferson Seminary, and didn’t actually open until 1813. Now you know. And knowing is half the battle.

                    

Their 900 Wins

Tuesday, October 23rd, 2012

Congratulations are in order. As much as I despise that stupid, stupid team from up north of Toledo somewhere, I think that it should be recognized that on Saturday, October 20, 2012, they became the first college football team to win 900 games. The nearly equally ugly folks at Michigan State could have and should have kept this milestone at bay for another week, but there it is. It’s in the books now. Whoopity doo.

One hundred and thirty-three years ago, this same team from that same school up north won its first game. It was a 1-0 victory over the now defunct Racine College Purple Stockings and was played at Chicago’s Grant Park on May 30, 1879. The “rugby-football” game was played in two 45-minute “innings”, and would be unidentifiable to today’s football fan. By one account, “…when one of them caught the ball he instantly passed it to a colleague nearer the enemy’s goal and they were only discomfited when they practiced Racine’s attempt to run with the ball dodging others.” Clearly Deenard Robinson was not playing, as they passed well and struggled to run with the ball. The second and final game of this season was played (in what sane persons would consider the following season) on November 1, 1879 against the University of Toronto. Played in Detroit, the game ended in a 0-0 tie. The Detroit Free Press announced approximately 500 attendees, while UM’s records shockingly list a figure three times as large. If my experience of sitting in the visitors’ section at the “big” house is any indication, then they probably stuffed those 500 fans into 450 seats. BURN! Considering the dominance exhibited by this 1-0-1 season, it is amazing that the pollsters did not reward TTUN with a national championship.

In 1880, TTUN recorded its first undefeated and untied season with a record of 1-0-0. They unleashed hell in a return match against the University of Toronto in their own backyard: The Toronto Lacrosse Club. This 13-6 drubbing was the worst slaughter on this site since the now famous 1872 Hamilton Thursday Gentleman’s Lacrosse Club victory over the East York School for Boys.

The wolverines would not look this silly again until they donned their corn and blue.

In 1881, TTUN recorded its first losing season. In fact, it was their worst season ever. Perhaps playing actual football for the first time, and certainly against quality opponents for the first time, they went 0-3-0 against the Ivy League’s best, and oldest schools.

The 1882 season was memorable for two terrible reasons. First, they did not lose a single game. Luckily, they also neither won nor tied any games, as they did not play anyone from another school that year. Second, this was the first year during which an Ohioan earned a varsity letter for treason. Yes sir, Mr Horace Prettyman from Stryker, Ohio played “rusher” for the wolverines. You heard me right: Prettyman. Seems rather appropriate to me. He is also remembered as winning the most varsity letters for football, having played for eight years in Ann Arbor.

I’m not sure how you earn a varsity letter in a year when you don’t play any other teams…

Other opponents in the early years include the Detroit Independents, Stevens Institute of Technology, Windsor (from Ontario), Peninsular Cricket Club, the Detroit Athletic Club, Ann Arbor High School, the Michigan Military Academy, Rush Lake Forest, Physicians and Surgeons-Chicago, and Grand Rapids High School.

A game that was not included in the official team statistics was an 1885 match against the Princess football team from Detroit. It was played on roller skates, on a roller rink. Seriously. TTUN won, as they excel at roller skating.

In 1890, they defeated the Purdue Boilermakers in the first match-up of future Big Ten schools. In 1892 they would play against five future Big Ten schools, going 2-3 against Wisconsin(w), Minnesota(l), Purdue(l), Northwestern(l), and Chicago(w). The foundations had been laid for the formation of the Western College Athletic League, later the Big Ten.

October 16, 1897 saw Ohio State lose to TTUN in the very first installment of The Game. Booooooooooo!

In 1901 they got a new head coach named Fielding Yost, won the first ever college football bowl game (a 49-0 Rose Bowl victory over Stanford), and won their first national championship (shared with Harvard and Yale).

Aaaaaaaaand at about this point I grow sick of this project. I quit. Congratulations stupid michigan. I hate you.

Sincerely,

Me

Ohio Pride

Tuesday, October 16th, 2012

I am a proud Ohioan, born and raised. Even though I have spent the majority of my post-OSU days outside of the Buckeye State, I always maintained that pride. Especially in sports. I still checked some of the local papers online for scores, got pissed off when Pennsylvania beat Ohio in the Big 33 Football Classic, looked for St Ignatius, St Xavier and the like in the national football rankings, and, of course, wore my Ohio State shirts everywhere. I took none of the intended offense at being called “Ohio” by that big, sloppy man who will be coaching that team up north for the next couple of years; and I burst with schadenfreude when their basketball team lost to the real Ohio University this past March.

Now I’m back in Ohio and recently received a jolting refreshment of my Ohio pride when I attended the fantastic Nebraska-Ohio State football game with the Buckeye Ninja. Then came a small explosion in my twittersphere when Ohio State, the University of Cincinnati, and Ohio University all featured in this week’s AP Top 25 at numbers 7, 21, and 25, respectively. (Of course, the BCS and USA Today polls chose not to include our scofflaw Buckeyes in their rankings.) But this made me wonder if such a thing has ever happened before, that three teams from the Great State of Ohio featured in the same AP poll. Our state does have a relatively large number of FBS schools, but only two that are in automatically qualifying conferences, one of which has been ranked regularly in polls of the past. (The Buckeye Ninja had to remind me that the Big East is indeed an AQ conference. Who knew?) Where California, Texas, and Florida (three of the four biggest states by population) have multiple major FBS schools from BCS automatically qualifying conferences, we have Ohio State and seven mid-majors. Even Indiana has three major BCS AQ schools. Indiana!

So I did a little research and found that, yes, it has happened before. For five consecutive AP Polls in 2003 there were three Ohio schools in the Top 25. The November 9th, 16th, 23rd, and 30th, and the final rankings all saw Ohio State, Miami University, and Bowling Green ranked. Ohio State peaked at 4th, Miami peaked at 10th, and Bowling Green peaked at 20th in those polls.

It also happened back on November 5, 1973, when the AP Poll only ranked twenty teams. In that week’s poll, Ohio State was ranked #1, Miami University was 17th, and Kent State was 19th. Earlier in that season Ohio State had been joined in the polls by Bowling Green, who was ranked 20th.

Of course, the appearance of Ohio State, Cincinnati, and Ohio U in this week’s AP Poll is made even more impressive considering the fact that all three schools (along with Xavier!) also made it to the Sweet Sixteen in this year’s NCAA Basketball Tournament. Impressive. Most impressive. My Ohio pride runneth over.

P.S.-Ohio State has been in 796 AP Polls, the most of any school. We are followed by Michigan (780), Oklahoma (728), Notre Dame (722), Southern California (714), Texas (693), Nebraska (691), Alabama (685), Penn State (591), and Tennessee (565).